Thomas Alva Edison Childhood Experiences Essays

Thomas Edison And The Invention Of The Light Bulb

There have been many awesome inventors with inventions still being used in our everyday lives. To choose the greatest invention or discovery of all time would be next to impossible. With all the technology today, all inventions seem as if we could not live without them. Thomas Edison's light bulb has been one of the biggest impacts on society even to this day.

Thomas wanted to replace the gaslight with a mild, safe, and inexpensive electric light. Edison invented the light bulb in 1879, and to this day the light bulb is still just as useful, if not more so. As time has passed, the light bulb has grown more important with more and more functions. Just think about how many different types of light bulbs we have now... in civilized areas there is hardly 10 sq. feet without at least one light bulb.

When the light bulb was first invented, its main function was to light the houses of millions and to light workplaces for millions more, making work less stressful on workers' eyes. This splendid invention allowed manufacturers to extend their workdays by many hours. Ever heard of the "graveyard shift?" This time period, and with the invention of the light bulb is probably where the graveyard shift came into play.

In 1878, the most agreeable source of lighting was gas. Unfortunately, gas was very inconvenient. It was unclean, nasty, unhealthy, uncomfortable and dangerous. When the gas was burned for lighting, it stained the fixtures, roof, and wallpaper with soot created from the gas. The fixtures pretty much had to be cleaned every day. It polluted the air by putting out soot and used up oxygen. It even made summer days hotter and more deplorable. It caused disasters, such as explosions and fires, not to mention it had to be tended by an adult. As you can see, a change was imperative as far as lighting went.

The light bulb has served many purposes, and also had many effects on the world, probably more than any other invention. For one, the light bulb allowed people to work longer days which made them more money. They also could go home late and still be able to have a meal or do any left over business they had from the day, even though it was already very dark outside. Inside their homes, it was as if the sun was not even down and gone yet. This was a very new feeling and concept to people from that era. This also led manufacturers to generate a larger amount of products because of the extended work hours. Social events, such as parties and meetings, could also take place in the evening now. Things that were unable to perform or complete by lantern or candlelight after a long hard day of work, could also now be accomplished.

Still, to this day, the light bulb is a part of our everyday lives. It hasn't been modified or improved that much either. In a way, we almost take for granted the fact that without...

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Thomas Alva Edison Essay

578 Words3 Pages

Thomas Alva Edison Thomas Alva Edison was one of the greatest inventors. He was a smart man. Thomas invented many things such as the light bulb and phonograph. Without the light bulb we would still be using candles and lanterns like they did many years ago. Although Thomas was deaf he worked hard and never gave up.

Thomas Alva Edison was born on February 11, 1847 in Milan, Ohio. He had many family members. He had a father named Samuel Odgen Edison and a mother named Nancy Elliott Edison. Thomas' mother pulled him from school because Thomas' teacher called him a"retard." Nancy Edison taught her son at home. Thomas has six siblings and he was the youngest child in the Edison family. Thomas was interested in many…show more content…

Thomas studied books on mechanics, manufacturing, and chemistry at the public library. He spent a long time studying Newtown's Principles. He also read lots of books such as Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Hume's History of England,
Sear's History of the World, Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, and The Dictoinaries of Sciences.

Thomas Edison invented the light bulb. In October of 1879 Edison patented his incandescent lamp. Edison and his team made a new vacuum pump to make better vacuums in glass light bulbs. It was better known as the "glow bulb." Thomas' second attempt at the glow bulb successfully lit for forty hours. On New Year's Eve Edison lit up Menlo
Park with thirty glow bulbs. Electricity would replace gas for lighting purposes. The light bulb gives off light so that we can see with out lanterns and candles. The Edison Lamp Company produced 1,000 lightbulbs a day.

It has improved since it's original version. In 1880, Edison invented the incandescent lamp. In the year 1910, Tungsten filament was discovered giving off white light instead of yellow light. In 1925, lamps were given an inside frosting that had a fine spray of hydrofluoric acid. In the late 19th century, florescent lamps were invented. Theyare tubes filled with low-pressure neon gas.

Thomas Edison invented many things we still used today. I think the light bulb was the greatest invention because it is hard to see with out light bulbs. Without the

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