Drion G. Boucias Bibliography

1. Lorch J.M., Meteyer C.U., Behr M.J., Boyles J.G., Cryan P.M., Hicks A.C., Ballmann A.E., Coleman J.T., Redell D.N., Reeder D.M., et al. Experimental infection of bats with Geomyces destructans causes white-nose syndrome. Nature. 2011;480:376–378. doi: 10.1038/nature10590.[PubMed][Cross Ref]

2. North American bat death toll exceeds 5.5 million from white-nose syndrome. [(accessed on 1 February 2012)]. Available online: http://www.batcon.org/pdfs/USFWS_WNS_Mortality_2012_NR_FINAL.pdf.

3. Turner G.G., Reeder D.M., Coleman J.T. A five-year assessment of mortality and geographic spread of white-nose syndrome in North American bats and a look to the future. Bat Res. News. 2011;52:13–27.

4. Lucan R.K., Bandouchova H., Bartonicka T., Pikula J., Zahradnikova Jr A., Zukal J., Martinkova N. Ectoparasites may serve as vectors for the white-nose syndrome fungus. Parasit. Vectors. 2016 doi: 10.1186/s13071-016-1302-2.[PMC free article][PubMed][Cross Ref]

5. Raudabaugh D.B., Miller A.N. Nutritional capability of and substrate suitability for Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the causal agent of bat white-nose syndrome. PLoS ONE. 2013;8:16 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0078300.[PMC free article][PubMed][Cross Ref]

6. Ribeiro J.M., Labruna M.B., Mans B.J., Maruyama S.R., Francischetti I.M., Barizon G.C., de Miranda Santos I.K. The sialotranscriptome of Antricola delacruzi female ticks is compatible with non-hematophagous behavior and an alternative source of food. Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 2012;42:332–342. doi: 10.1016/j.ibmb.2012.01.003.[PMC free article][PubMed][Cross Ref]

7. Vanderwolf K.J., Malloch D., McAlpine D.F., Forbes G.J. A world review of fungi, yeasts and slime molds in caves. Int. J. Spel. 2013;42:77–96. doi: 10.5038/1827-806X.42.1.9.[Cross Ref]

8. Benoit J.B., Yoder J.A., Zettler L.W., Hobbs H.H. Mycoflora of a trogloxenic Cave Cricket, Hadenoecus cumberlandicus (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae), from two small caves in northeastern Kentucky. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 2004;97:989–993. doi: 10.1603/0013-8746(2004)097[0989:MOATCC]2.0.CO;2.[Cross Ref]

9. Yoder J.A., Benoit J.B., Christensen B.S., Croxall T.J., Hobbs III H.H. Entomopathogenic fungi carried by the cave orb weaver spider, Meta ovalis (Araneae, Tetragnathidae), with implications for mycoflora transfer to cave crickets. J. Cave Karst Stud. 2009;71:116–120.

10. Pugsley C. Ecology of the New Zealand glowworm, Arachnocampa luminosa (Diptera: Keroplatidae), in the Glowworm Cave, Waitomo. J. R. Soc. NZ. 1984;14:387–407. doi: 10.1080/03036758.1984.10421739.[Cross Ref]

11. Yoder J.A., Benoit J.B., Hobbs H.H., III, Nelson B.W., Main L.R., Gibas C.F. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria caledonica, a newly identified pathogen of cave crickets, Hadenoecus spp. (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) Speleobiology Notes. 2015;7:1–9.

12. Smrž J., Kováč L., Mikeš J., Šustr V., Lukešová A., Tajovský K., Nováková A., Režňáková P. Food sources of selected terrestrial cave arthropods. Subterr. Biol. 2015;16:37–46. doi: 10.3897/subtbiol.16.8609.[Cross Ref]

13. Estrada-Bárcenas D.A., Palacios-Vargas J.G., Estrada-Venegas E., Klimov P.B., Martínez-Mena A., Taylor M.L. Biological activity of the mite Sancassania sp. (Acari: Acaridae) from bat guano associated with the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Mem. Inst. Oswaldo. Cruz. 2010;105:127–131.[PubMed]

14. Stephenson S., Slay M., Slay C., Tuggle A. Cave crickets (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) as vectors of Dictyostelids (Protista: Dictyosteliida) Entomol. News. 2007;118:292–295. doi: 10.3157/0013-872X(2007)118[292:CCOAVO]2.0.CO;2.[Cross Ref]

15. Boyer-Lefevre N.H. Les Laboulbéniales des Trechinae cavernicoles pyrénéens. Ann. Spéléo. 1966;21:775–794.

16. Enghoff H., Santamaria S. Infectious intimacy and contaminated caves––Three new species of ectoparasitic fungi (Ascomycota: Laboulbeniales) from blaniulid millipedes (Diplopoda: Julida) and inferences about their transmittal mechanisms. Org. Divers. Evol. 2015;15:249–263. doi: 10.1007/s13127-015-0208-8.[Cross Ref]

17. Langwig K.E., Frick W.F., Reynolds R., Parise K.L., Drees K.P., Hoyt J.R., Cheng T.L., Kunz T.H., Foster J.T., Kilpatrick A.M. Host and pathogen ecology drive the seasonal dynamics of a fungal disease, white-nose syndrome. Proc. R. Soc. B. 2014 doi: 10.1098/rspb.2014.2335.[PMC free article][PubMed][Cross Ref]

18. Dickson G.W. A preliminary study of heterotrophic microorganisms as factors in substrate of troglobitic invertebrates. NSS. Bull. 1975;37:89–93.

19. Malloch D., Blackwell M. Dispersal biology of the ophiostomatoid fungi. In: Wingfield M.J., Seifert K.A., Webber J.F., editors. Certatocystis and Ophiostoma. Taxonomy, Ecology and Pathogenicity. APS; Saint Paul, MN, USA: 1993. pp. 195–206.

20. Agrios G.M. Plant pathology. 3rd ed. Academic Press Inc.; San Diego, CA, USA: 1988. pp. 416–422.

21. Vanderwolf K.J., McAlpine D.F., Malloch D., Forbes G.J. Ectomycota associated with hibernating cave bats in eastern Canada prior to the emergence of white-nose syndrome. Northeast. Nat. 2013;20:115–130. doi: 10.1656/045.020.0109.[Cross Ref]

22. Vanderwolf K.J., Malloch D., McAlpine D.F. Fungi associated with over-wintering Tricolored bats, Perimyotis subflavus, in a white-nose syndrome region of Eastern Canada. J. Cave Karst Stud. 2015;77:145–151.

23. McAlpine D.F., Vanderwolf K.J., Forbes G.J., Malloch D. Consumption of bats (Myotis spp.) by raccoons (Procyon lotor) during an outbreak of white-nose syndrome in New Brunswick: Implications for bat mortality estimates. Can. Field Nat. 2011;125:257–260.

24. Peck S.B. A review of the cave fauna of Canada, and the composition and ecology of the invertebrate fauna of caves and mines in Ontario. Can. J. Zool. 1988;66:1197–1213. doi: 10.1139/z88-176.[Cross Ref]

25. Moseley M. Acadian biospeleology: composition and ecology of cave fauna of Nova Scotia and southern New Brunswick, Canada. Int. J. Spel. 2007;36:1–21. doi: 10.5038/1827-806X.36.1.1.[Cross Ref]

26. Vanderwolf K.J., McAlpine D.F., Forbes G.J., Malloch D. Winter bat populations and cave microclimate prior to and at the onset of white-nose syndrome in New Brunswick. Can. Field Nat. 2012;126:125–134.

27. United States Fish and Wildlife Service Revised decontamination protocol (June 25, 2012) [(accessed on 15 December 2015)]. Available online: http://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/resource/revised-decontamination-protocol-june-25-2012.

28. Holmberg R.G., Angerilli N.P., LaCasse L.J. Overwintering aggregations of Leiobunum paessleri in caves and mines (Arachnida, Opiliones) J. Arachnol. 1984;12:195–204.

29. Vockeroth J.R. Mycetophilidae. In: McAlpine J.F., Peterson B.V., Shewell G.E., Teskey H.J., Vockeroth J.R., Wood D.M., editors. Manual of Nearctic Diptera Volume 1. Biosystematics Research Institute Agriculture Canada; Ottawa, Canada: 1981. pp. 223–246.

30. Papavizas G.C., Davey C.B. Evaluation of various media and antimicrobial agents for isolation of soil fungi. Soil. Sci. 1958;88:112–117. doi: 10.1097/00010694-195988020-00010.[Cross Ref]

31. Domsch K.H., Gams W., Anderson T.H. Compendium of Soil Fungi. 2nd ed. IHW-Verlag; Regensburg, Germany: 2007. p. 672.

32. Seifert K., Morgan-Jones G., Gams W., Kendrick B. The Genera of Hyphomycetes. CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre; Utrecht, the Netherlands: 2011. p. 997.

33. Khankhet J., Vanderwolf K.J., McAlpine D.F., McBurney S., Overy D.P., Slavic D., Xu J. Clonal expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans genotype in North America is accompanied by significant variation in phenotypic expression. PLoS ONE. 2014;9:16 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0104684.[PMC free article][PubMed][Cross Ref]

34. Foster J., Drees K. (University of New Hampshire). Personal Communitcation. 2014.

35. Moseley M., Hebda A. Overwintering Leiobunum elegans (Opiliones: Phalangiidae) in Caves and Mines in Nova Scotia. Proc. N. S. Inst. Sci. 2001;41:216–218.

36. Dickson G.W., Kirk P.W. Distribution of heterotrophic microorganisms in relation to detritivores in Virginia caves (with supplemental bibliography on cave mycology and microbiology) In: Parker B.C., Roane M.K., editors. the Distributional History of the Biota of the Southern Appalachians. IV. Algae and Fungi. University of Virginia Press; Charlottesville, VA, USA: 1976. pp. 205–226.

37. Goodnight C.J., Goodnight M.L. Speciation among cave opilionids of the United States. Am. Midland. Nat. 1960;64:34–38. doi: 10.2307/2422891.[Cross Ref]

38. Balazy S., Wisniewski J., Kaczmarek S. Some noteworthy fungi occurring on mites. B. Pol. Acad. Sci. Biol. 1987;35:199–224.

39. Kubatova A., Cerny M., Novakova A. New records of micromycetes from the Czech Republic. IV. Acrodontium salmoneum, Chaunopycnis alba, and Cylindrocarpostylus gregarious, and notes on Dactylaria lanosa and Trichoderma saturnisporum. Czech. Mycol. 2001;53:237–255.

40. Hwang S.C., Chen C.L. A new leaf-speckle disease of banana caused by Acrodontium simplex in Taiwan. Plant. Protect. Bull. 1986;28:413–416.

41. Cabello M.N. Deuteromycotina from Antarctica––New species of hyphomycetes from Danco coast, Antarctic peninsula. Mycotaxon. 1989;36:91–94.

42. Meyer-Rochow V.B., Liddle A.R. Structure and function of the eyes of two species of opilionid from New Zealand glow-worm caves (Megalopsalis tumida: Palpatores, and Hendea myersi cavernicola: Laniatores) Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B. 1988;233:293–319. doi: 10.1098/rspb.1988.0023.[Cross Ref]

43. Machado G., Raimundo R.L., Oliveira P.S. Daily activity schedule, gregariousness, and defensive behaviour in the Neotropical harvestman Goniosoma longipes (Opiliones: Gonyleptidae) J. Nat. Hist. 2000;34:587–596. doi: 10.1080/002229300299453.[Cross Ref]

44. Mains E.B. Entomogenous species of Akanthomyces, Hymenostilbe and Insecticola in north America. Mycologia. 1950;42:566–589. doi: 10.2307/3755572.[Cross Ref]

45. Leatherdale D. The arthropod hosts of entomogenous fungi in Britain. Entomophaga. 1970;15:419–435. doi: 10.1007/BF02370311.[Cross Ref]

46. Greenstone M.H., Ignoffo C.M., Samson R.A. Susceptibility of spider species to fungus Nomuraea atypicola. J. Arachnol. 1987;15:266–268.

47. Mitov P.G. Harvestmen (Opiliones, Arachnida)––Carriers of plant and fungus spores. Acta. Zool. Bulg. 1992;43:75–77.

48. Cokendolpher J.C. Pathogens and parasites of Opiliones (Arthropoda: Arachnida) J. Arachnol. 1993;21:120–146.

49. Cokendolpher J.C., Mitov P.G. Natural enemies. In: Pinto-da-Rocha R., Machado G., Giribet G., editors. Harvestmen: The Biology of Opiliones. Harvard University Press; Cambridge, MA, USA: 2007. pp. 339–373.

50. Balazy S. A new species of entomophthoraceae (Mycophyta: Entomophthorales) from Poland. J. Invert. Path. 1978;31:275–279. doi: 10.1016/0022-2011(78)90216-1.[Cross Ref]

51. Keller S. Arthropod-pathogenic Entomophthorales of Switzerland. I. Conidiobolus, Entomophaga, and Entomophthora. Sydowia. 1987;40:122–167.

52. McKillop W.B. Scoliopteryx libatrix (Noctuidae) and Triphosa haesitata (Geometridae) in caves in Manitoba, Canada. J. Lepid. Soc. 1993;47:106–113.

53. Kowalski W. Ethological and ecological observations on Lepidoptera in their subterranean hibernating places in the vicinity of Cracow. Zeszyty Naukowe Uniwersytetu Jagiellonskiego. Prace Zoologiczne, Zeszyt. 1965;103:97–157.

54. Roederk K.D., Fenton M.B. Acoustic responsiveness of Scoliopteryx libatrix L. (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a moth that shares hibernacula with some insectivorous bats. Can. J. Zool. 2011;51

1. Lorch J.M., Meteyer C.U., Behr M.J., Boyles J.G., Cryan P.M., Hicks A.C., Ballmann A.E., Coleman J.T., Redell D.N., Reeder D.M., et al. Experimental infection of bats with Geomyces destructans causes white-nose syndrome. Nature. 2011;480:376–378. doi: 10.1038/nature10590.[PubMed][Cross Ref]

2. North American bat death toll exceeds 5.5 million from white-nose syndrome. [(accessed on 1 February 2012)]. Available online: http://www.batcon.org/pdfs/USFWS_WNS_Mortality_2012_NR_FINAL.pdf.

3. Turner G.G., Reeder D.M., Coleman J.T. A five-year assessment of mortality and geographic spread of white-nose syndrome in North American bats and a look to the future. Bat Res. News. 2011;52:13–27.

4. Lucan R.K., Bandouchova H., Bartonicka T., Pikula J., Zahradnikova Jr A., Zukal J., Martinkova N. Ectoparasites may serve as vectors for the white-nose syndrome fungus. Parasit. Vectors. 2016 doi: 10.1186/s13071-016-1302-2.[PMC free article][PubMed][Cross Ref]

5. Raudabaugh D.B., Miller A.N. Nutritional capability of and substrate suitability for Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the causal agent of bat white-nose syndrome. PLoS ONE. 2013;8:16 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0078300.[PMC free article][PubMed][Cross Ref]

6. Ribeiro J.M., Labruna M.B., Mans B.J., Maruyama S.R., Francischetti I.M., Barizon G.C., de Miranda Santos I.K. The sialotranscriptome of Antricola delacruzi female ticks is compatible with non-hematophagous behavior and an alternative source of food. Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 2012;42:332–342. doi: 10.1016/j.ibmb.2012.01.003.[PMC free article][PubMed][Cross Ref]

7. Vanderwolf K.J., Malloch D., McAlpine D.F., Forbes G.J. A world review of fungi, yeasts and slime molds in caves. Int. J. Spel. 2013;42:77–96. doi: 10.5038/1827-806X.42.1.9.[Cross Ref]

8. Benoit J.B., Yoder J.A., Zettler L.W., Hobbs H.H. Mycoflora of a trogloxenic Cave Cricket, Hadenoecus cumberlandicus (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae), from two small caves in northeastern Kentucky. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 2004;97:989–993. doi: 10.1603/0013-8746(2004)097[0989:MOATCC]2.0.CO;2.[Cross Ref]

9. Yoder J.A., Benoit J.B., Christensen B.S., Croxall T.J., Hobbs III H.H. Entomopathogenic fungi carried by the cave orb weaver spider, Meta ovalis (Araneae, Tetragnathidae), with implications for mycoflora transfer to cave crickets. J. Cave Karst Stud. 2009;71:116–120.

10. Pugsley C. Ecology of the New Zealand glowworm, Arachnocampa luminosa (Diptera: Keroplatidae), in the Glowworm Cave, Waitomo. J. R. Soc. NZ. 1984;14:387–407. doi: 10.1080/03036758.1984.10421739.[Cross Ref]

11. Yoder J.A., Benoit J.B., Hobbs H.H., III, Nelson B.W., Main L.R., Gibas C.F. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria caledonica, a newly identified pathogen of cave crickets, Hadenoecus spp. (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) Speleobiology Notes. 2015;7:1–9.

12. Smrž J., Kováč L., Mikeš J., Šustr V., Lukešová A., Tajovský K., Nováková A., Režňáková P. Food sources of selected terrestrial cave arthropods. Subterr. Biol. 2015;16:37–46. doi: 10.3897/subtbiol.16.8609.[Cross Ref]

13. Estrada-Bárcenas D.A., Palacios-Vargas J.G., Estrada-Venegas E., Klimov P.B., Martínez-Mena A., Taylor M.L. Biological activity of the mite Sancassania sp. (Acari: Acaridae) from bat guano associated with the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Mem. Inst. Oswaldo. Cruz. 2010;105:127–131.[PubMed]

14. Stephenson S., Slay M., Slay C., Tuggle A. Cave crickets (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) as vectors of Dictyostelids (Protista: Dictyosteliida) Entomol. News. 2007;118:292–295. doi: 10.3157/0013-872X(2007)118[292:CCOAVO]2.0.CO;2.[Cross Ref]

15. Boyer-Lefevre N.H. Les Laboulbéniales des Trechinae cavernicoles pyrénéens. Ann. Spéléo. 1966;21:775–794.

16. Enghoff H., Santamaria S. Infectious intimacy and contaminated caves––Three new species of ectoparasitic fungi (Ascomycota: Laboulbeniales) from blaniulid millipedes (Diplopoda: Julida) and inferences about their transmittal mechanisms. Org. Divers. Evol. 2015;15:249–263. doi: 10.1007/s13127-015-0208-8.[Cross Ref]

17. Langwig K.E., Frick W.F., Reynolds R., Parise K.L., Drees K.P., Hoyt J.R., Cheng T.L., Kunz T.H., Foster J.T., Kilpatrick A.M. Host and pathogen ecology drive the seasonal dynamics of a fungal disease, white-nose syndrome. Proc. R. Soc. B. 2014 doi: 10.1098/rspb.2014.2335.[PMC free article][PubMed][Cross Ref]

18. Dickson G.W. A preliminary study of heterotrophic microorganisms as factors in substrate of troglobitic invertebrates. NSS. Bull. 1975;37:89–93.

19. Malloch D., Blackwell M. Dispersal biology of the ophiostomatoid fungi. In: Wingfield M.J., Seifert K.A., Webber J.F., editors. Certatocystis and Ophiostoma. Taxonomy, Ecology and Pathogenicity. APS; Saint Paul, MN, USA: 1993. pp. 195–206.

20. Agrios G.M. Plant pathology. 3rd ed. Academic Press Inc.; San Diego, CA, USA: 1988. pp. 416–422.

21. Vanderwolf K.J., McAlpine D.F., Malloch D., Forbes G.J. Ectomycota associated with hibernating cave bats in eastern Canada prior to the emergence of white-nose syndrome. Northeast. Nat. 2013;20:115–130. doi: 10.1656/045.020.0109.[Cross Ref]

22. Vanderwolf K.J., Malloch D., McAlpine D.F. Fungi associated with over-wintering Tricolored bats, Perimyotis subflavus, in a white-nose syndrome region of Eastern Canada. J. Cave Karst Stud. 2015;77:145–151.

23. McAlpine D.F., Vanderwolf K.J., Forbes G.J., Malloch D. Consumption of bats (Myotis spp.) by raccoons (Procyon lotor) during an outbreak of white-nose syndrome in New Brunswick: Implications for bat mortality estimates. Can. Field Nat. 2011;125:257–260.

24. Peck S.B. A review of the cave fauna of Canada, and the composition and ecology of the invertebrate fauna of caves and mines in Ontario. Can. J. Zool. 1988;66:1197–1213. doi: 10.1139/z88-176.[Cross Ref]

25. Moseley M. Acadian biospeleology: composition and ecology of cave fauna of Nova Scotia and southern New Brunswick, Canada. Int. J. Spel. 2007;36:1–21. doi: 10.5038/1827-806X.36.1.1.[Cross Ref]

26. Vanderwolf K.J., McAlpine D.F., Forbes G.J., Malloch D. Winter bat populations and cave microclimate prior to and at the onset of white-nose syndrome in New Brunswick. Can. Field Nat. 2012;126:125–134.

27. United States Fish and Wildlife Service Revised decontamination protocol (June 25, 2012) [(accessed on 15 December 2015)]. Available online: http://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/resource/revised-decontamination-protocol-june-25-2012.

28. Holmberg R.G., Angerilli N.P., LaCasse L.J. Overwintering aggregations of Leiobunum paessleri in caves and mines (Arachnida, Opiliones) J. Arachnol. 1984;12:195–204.

29. Vockeroth J.R. Mycetophilidae. In: McAlpine J.F., Peterson B.V., Shewell G.E., Teskey H.J., Vockeroth J.R., Wood D.M., editors. Manual of Nearctic Diptera Volume 1. Biosystematics Research Institute Agriculture Canada; Ottawa, Canada: 1981. pp. 223–246.

30. Papavizas G.C., Davey C.B. Evaluation of various media and antimicrobial agents for isolation of soil fungi. Soil. Sci. 1958;88:112–117. doi: 10.1097/00010694-195988020-00010.[Cross Ref]

31. Domsch K.H., Gams W., Anderson T.H. Compendium of Soil Fungi. 2nd ed. IHW-Verlag; Regensburg, Germany: 2007. p. 672.

32. Seifert K., Morgan-Jones G., Gams W., Kendrick B. The Genera of Hyphomycetes. CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre; Utrecht, the Netherlands: 2011. p. 997.

33. Khankhet J., Vanderwolf K.J., McAlpine D.F., McBurney S., Overy D.P., Slavic D., Xu J. Clonal expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans genotype in North America is accompanied by significant variation in phenotypic expression. PLoS ONE. 2014;9:16 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0104684.[PMC free article][PubMed][Cross Ref]

34. Foster J., Drees K. (University of New Hampshire). Personal Communitcation. 2014.

35. Moseley M., Hebda A. Overwintering Leiobunum elegans (Opiliones: Phalangiidae) in Caves and Mines in Nova Scotia. Proc. N. S. Inst. Sci. 2001;41:216–218.

36. Dickson G.W., Kirk P.W. Distribution of heterotrophic microorganisms in relation to detritivores in Virginia caves (with supplemental bibliography on cave mycology and microbiology) In: Parker B.C., Roane M.K., editors. the Distributional History of the Biota of the Southern Appalachians. IV. Algae and Fungi. University of Virginia Press; Charlottesville, VA, USA: 1976. pp. 205–226.

37. Goodnight C.J., Goodnight M.L. Speciation among cave opilionids of the United States. Am. Midland. Nat. 1960;64:34–38. doi: 10.2307/2422891.[Cross Ref]

38. Balazy S., Wisniewski J., Kaczmarek S. Some noteworthy fungi occurring on mites. B. Pol. Acad. Sci. Biol. 1987;35:199–224.

39.

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