Xenogenesis Harlan Ellison Essay

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Marcantony

10-23-2008, 02:15 AM

this is just so wrong (http://forbiddenplanet.co.uk/blog/?p=9886)

In summary a fanboy tracked down a comic writer's address, wiped his ass on some paper and then sent it to the writer to display his opinion of his writing skills.


Hodden

10-23-2008, 02:40 AM

While I in no way condone this, I shall point out to the non-2000AD readers that Stalag 666 is really fucking terrible, easily the worst 2000AD strip since the lesbian space vikings thing about ten years ago, and that was clearly better as it as lesbian space vikings.


Brad Ellison

10-23-2008, 02:58 AM

Okay, actually doing this is definitely crossing the line, but who hasn't thought about doing this?


Ratman_tf

10-23-2008, 03:04 AM

Punchline: He didn't live there anymore, so the first person to open the shit-letter was a family member or close aquaintance who lived there now.

Shit-letter mailing man not only did something extremely stupid and disgusting, but he then magnified his failure by missing the target.


Major Grubert

10-23-2008, 09:28 AM

this is just so wrong (http://forbiddenplanet.co.uk/blog/?p=9886)
...

That's one of the most cowardly things I've ever read. High on the 'someone just doesn't get it' scale too.


Critical Liz

10-23-2008, 09:30 AM

Wow, so much effort put into something so stupid.


KingDobbs

10-23-2008, 09:35 AM

Shit, the least he could have done is gone there in person and wiped his ass on a sheet of paper and handed it to the guy.

It would have made for better dramatic effect, at least.


Mark Berryman

10-23-2008, 10:58 AM

Shit-letter mailing man not only did something extremely stupid and disgusting, but he then magnified his failure by missing the target.

QFT


Sherlock Doyle

10-23-2008, 11:09 AM

Punchline: He didn't live there anymore, so the first person to open the shit-letter was a family member or close aquaintance who lived there now.

I started laughing uncontrollably.


Piestrio

10-23-2008, 11:13 AM

That has to be illegal.

I hope he turned it over to the police.

Piestrio


Madcat

10-23-2008, 02:07 PM

Stalag 666 is boring, but at least it's followable, not like f-ing Lobster Random or that ugly B&W horror series.


Craig Oxbrow

10-23-2008, 02:16 PM

While I in no way condone this, I shall point out to the non-2000AD readers that Stalag 666 is really fucking terrible, easily the worst 2000AD strip since the lesbian space vikings thing about ten years ago, and that was clearly better as it as lesbian space vikings.

Huh. I don't think it's even the worst thing in 2000AD at the moment...


Moxiane

10-23-2008, 02:29 PM

My initial thought on reading the OP was "I hope it's Rob Liefeld."


Rolzup

10-23-2008, 02:31 PM

If you ever really want to lose all faith in fandom, track down Harlan Ellison's essay "Xenogenesis", which is just plain scary in places.

The attack on Alan Dean Foster is particularly disgusting. In several senses.


Brandi

10-23-2008, 03:09 PM

If you ever really want to lose all faith in fandom, track down Harlan Ellison's essay "Xenogenesis", which is just plain scary in places.

The attack on Alan Dean Foster is particularly disgusting. In several senses.

I've been trying to-- any chance it got put up online anywhere?


Tiran

10-23-2008, 03:14 PM

That has to be illegal.

I hope he turned it over to the police.

Piestrio

Turn over the shit stained paper to the police? I'm sure they'll appreciate that.


Xenu's Paradox

10-23-2008, 03:18 PM

Turn over the shit stained paper to the police? I'm sure they'll appreciate that.

A crime was committed, and the paper is evidence. It's their job to take it.

Also, this is likely NOT the grossest thing a PD has logged (pun intended) into evidence.

I certainly hope the person who sent it gets some harsh penalties.


Armitage

10-23-2008, 03:57 PM

If you ever really want to lose all faith in fandom, track down Harlan Ellison's essay "Xenogenesis", which is just plain scary in places.

The attack on Alan Dean Foster is particularly disgusting. In several senses.

I've never read it, but it certainly sounds interesting.


A speech and essay written by Harlan Ellison. In it, he details some of the shockingly hateful, rude, and stupid acts that have been committed against authors of fantasy and science fiction by the people who call themselves their "fans." Harlan tells how one of his fans made anonymous, harassing phone calls and death threats to him for years, how one of Spider Robinson's fans offered to buy him dinner, then stuck him with the very expensive bill, how one of Alan Dean Foster's fans threw a cup of vomit in his face. Why, Ellison asks, are fantasy and sci-fi authors treated this way and not, for instance, John Updike, Tom Wolfe, or Norman Mailer?

I wonder if this was written before or after a "fan" reported him to the Secret Service for threatening the President, because he didn't express sufficient gratitude to her for "making him famous".

And if you extend it to other areas of science fiction, there's always Claudia Christian and the Killer Tribble.


Okay, actually doing this is definitely crossing the line, but who hasn't thought about doing this?

Raises hand.

No matter how much I might not like some writers' work:

a) This is just fucking crass and stupid
b) That would make me "that guy" and I have devoted my entire life to not being "that guy."

So no, I've never even considered this.


Marcantony

10-23-2008, 06:02 PM

And if you extend it to other areas of science fiction, there's always Claudia Christian and the Killer Tribble.


Ok, Ill bite. What?


Armitage

10-23-2008, 06:20 PM

Ok, Ill bite. What?

A fan in a Tribble costume shot her at a convention.
Fortunately, the gun was loaded with blanks.


Some freak turned up to a con dressed as a Tribble - enormous shapeless furry thing - and wanted to have his pic taken with Claudia. Who did the usual, stood next to him, arm around him, big smile -

-- and a gun poked out of the side of the Tribble and fired into her side.

Blank round. Extensive bruising, bit of a mess, but she lived. And now she has a security presence at conventions. And she has a drink after them.


A fan in a Tribble costume shot her at a convention.
Fortunately, the gun was loaded with blanks.

Some people just need the crap beaten out of them. They might also need intensive therapy, but they also need the crap beaten out of them.


Xenu's Paradox

10-23-2008, 07:33 PM

Wow. How did she not get hurt a lot worse?

From what I understand, blanks fired at a person from that close a range will blow a hole in you.


suedenim

10-23-2008, 08:26 PM

Wow. How did she not get hurt a lot worse?

From what I understand, blanks fired at a person from that close a range will blow a hole in you.

Hmm, that's what I thought too, but not exactly. From the case of Jon-Erik Hexum, which we're both likely thinking of:



Hexum was apparently unaware that blanks use paper or plastic wadding to seal gun powder into the shell, and that this wadding is propelled out of the barrel of the gun with enough force to cause severe injury or death if the weapon is fired within a few inches of the body, especially if pointed at a particularly vulnerable spot, such as the temple or the eye. Although the paper wadding in the blank that Hexum discharged did not penetrate his skull, the wad struck him in the temple with enough blunt force trauma to shatter a quarter-sized piece of his skull and propel the pieces into his brain causing massive hemorrhaging.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon-Erik_Hexum


Was the discharge intentional in the case of the Tribble? It sounds that way, but I suppose it could also be a guy with piss-poor gun safety habits exacerbated by carrying a concealed weapon in a giant Tribble costume.


Xenu's Paradox

10-23-2008, 08:49 PM

Hmm, that's what I thought too, but not exactly. From the case of Jon-Erik Hexum, which we're both likely thinking of:



Was the discharge intentional in the case of the Tribble? It sounds that way, but I suppose it could also be a guy with piss-poor gun safety habits exacerbated by carrying a concealed weapon in a giant Tribble costume.

I was more thinking of the time I saw a guy blow apart a watermelon with a blank.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.4 Release Candidate 1 Copyright © 2018 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.

Publication: The Essential Ellison: A 50-Year Retrospective

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Contents (view Concise Listing)

  • 1 • Introduction: Sublime Rebel • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 5 • Lagniappe • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 11 • Beginnings • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 15 • The Sword of Parmagon • (1949) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 21 • The Gloconda • (1949) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 27 • The Wilder One • (1955) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 29 • The Saga of Machine Gun Joe • (1955) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 31 • Introduction to "Glowworm" • (1977) • essay by Harlan Ellison (variant of About "Glowworm")
  • 35 • Glowworm • (1956) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 47 • Life Hutch • [Earth-Kyba War] • (1956) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 59 • S.R.O. • (1957) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 71 • Worlds of Terror • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 73 • Lonelyache • (1964) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 89 • Punky & the Yale Men • (1966) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 113 • A Prayer for No One's Enemy • (1966) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 131 • Pulling Hard Time • (1995) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 137 • Worlds of Love • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 139 • In Lonely Lands • (1959) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 145 • The Time of the Eye • (1959) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 153 • Grail • (1981) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 175 • That New Old-Time Religion • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 177 • I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream • (1967) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 191 • Corpse • (1972) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 199 • The Whimper of Whipped Dogs • (1973) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 217 • A Stab of Merriment • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 219 • The Voice in the Garden • (1967) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 221 • Erotophobia • (1971) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 227 • Mom • (1976) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 239 • Ecowareness • (1974) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 241 • The Outpost Undiscovered by Tourists • (1982) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 245 • Dept. of "What Was the Question?" Dept. • (1974) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 247 • Dept. of "Trivial Pursuit" Dept. • (1986) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 251 • Prince Myshkin, and Hold the Relish • (1982) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 257 • Trouble With Women • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 261 • The Very Last Day of a Good Woman • (1958) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 269 • Valerie: A True Memoir • (1972) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 283 • The Other Eye of Polyphemus • (1977) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 291 • All the Birds Come Home to Roost • (1979) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 301 • To the Mattresses With Mean Demons • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 307 • The Tombs • (1961) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 347 • "Our Little Miss" • (1970) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 355 • A Love Song to Jerry Falwell • (1984) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 361 • Telltale Tics and Tremors • (1977) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 371 • True Love: Groping for the Holy Grail • (1978) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 391 • Adrift Just Off the Islets of Langerhans: Latitude 38° 54' N, Longitude 77° 00' 13" W • (1974) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 419 • The Function of Dream Sleep • (1988) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 441 • Rococo Technology • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 447 • The Sky Is Burning • (1958) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 455 • The Prowler in the City at the Edge of the World • (1967) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 473 • Along the Scenic Route • (1969) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 483 • The Song the Zombie Sang • (1970) • short story by Harlan EllisonandRobert Silverberg
  • 495 • Knox • (1974) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 509 • With Virgil Oddum at the East Pole • (1985) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 527 • Heart's Blood • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 531 • From Alabamy, with Hate • (1965) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 543 • My Father • (1972) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 549 • My Mother • (1976) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 557 • Tired Old Man • non-genre • (1975) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 567 • Gopher in the Gilly • [Scenes from the Real World • 4] • (1982) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 573 • Strange Wine • (1976) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 581 • Nights & Days in Good Old Hollyweird • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 585 • The Resurgence of Miss Ankle-Strap Wedgie • (1968) • novella by Harlan Ellison
  • 655 • Flintlock: An Unproduced Teleplay • (1972) • short fiction by Harlan Ellison
  • 735 • The Man on the Mushroom • (1974) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 739 • Somehow, I Don't Think We're in Kansas, Toto • [Scenes from the Real World • 3] • (1974) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 755 • Face-Down in Gloria Swanson's Swimming Pool • (1978) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 759 • Petards & Hangings • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 763 • Soldier • (1957) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 781 • The Night of Delicate Terrors • (1961) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 789 • Shattered Like a Glass Goblin • (1968) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 797 • At the Mouse Circus • (1971) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 807 • Shadows from the Past • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 809 • Free With This Box! • (1958) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 817 • Final Shtick • (1960) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 827 • One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty • (1970) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 841 • Jeffty Is Five • (1977) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 863 • Daniel White for the Greater Good • (1961) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 873 • Neither Your Jenny nor Mine • (1964) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 907 • Alive and Well and on a Friendless Voyage • (1977) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 919 • The Classics • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 923 • "Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman • (1965) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 933 • Pretty Maggie Moneyeyes • (1967) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 951 • A Boy and His Dog • [Vic and Blood • 2] • (1969) • novella by Harlan Ellison
  • 985 • The Deathbird • (1973) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 1011 • Paladin of the Lost Hour • (1985) • novelette by Harlan Ellison
  • 1031 • Soft Monkey • (1987) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 1043 • Mefisto in Onyx • (1993) • novella by Harlan Ellison
  • 1085 • Process • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 1089 • Where I Shall Dwell in the Next World • (1992) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 1099 • The Museum on Cyclops Avenue • (1995) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 1109 • Objects of Desire in the Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear • (1999) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 1119 • Man on Spikes • (1998) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 1127 • Introduction to "Tired Old Man" • (1999) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 1131 • The Man Who Rowed Christopher Columbus Ashore • (1991) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 1147 • Dark Liberation • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling
  • 1151 • The Thick Red Moment • (1982) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 1169 • The Man Who Was Heavily into Revenge • (1978) • short story by Harlan Ellison
  • 1181 • Driving in the Spikes • (1983) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 1191 • An Edge in My Voice, Installment 55 (19 December 1982) • (1982) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 1195 • The Streets, Installment 1 (19 July 1990) • (1990) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 1199 • Xenogenesis • (1990) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 1237 • Afterword (The Essential Ellison) • (1987) • essay by Harlan Ellison
  • 8561 • Contracts on the Soul • (1987) • essay by Terry Dowling

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