Lse Essay

Essay 1 Introduction: L.S.E. cost theory in retrospect, by James M. Buchanan (1973)
Essay 2 Remarks upon certain aspects of the theory of costs, by Lionel Robbins (1934)
Essay 3 Economics and knowledge, by F. A. von Hayek (1937)
Essay 4 The rationale of cost accounting, by R. S. Edwards (1937)
Essay 5 Business organization and the accountant, by R. H. Coase (1938/1973)
Essay 6 The subjective theory of value and accounting 'cost', by G. F. Thirlby (1946)
Essay 7 The Ruler, by G. F. Thirlby (1946)
Essay 8 The economist's description of business behaviour, by G. F. Thirlby (1952)
Essay 9 Uncertainty, costs, and collectivist economic planning, by Jack Wiseman (1953)
Essay 10 The theory of public utility price—an empty box, by Jack Wiseman (1957)
Essay 11 Economists' cost rules and equilibrium theory, by G. F. Thirlby (1960)
Edited by: Buchanan, James M. and George F. Thirlby
First Pub. Date
1934
New York: New York University Press 1981 Collected essays, various authors, 1934-1973. First published as a collection 1973 for the London School of Economics. Includes essays by Ronald H. Coase, Friedrich A. Hayek, Lionel Robbins, and more.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cover
Table of Contents
About the Book and Author
Acknowledgements
Preface
Essay 1 Introduction: L.S.E. cost theory in retrospect, by James M. Buchanan (1973)
Essay 2 Remarks upon certain aspects of the theory of costs, by Lionel Robbins (1934)
Essay 3 Economics and knowledge, by F. A. von Hayek (1937)
Essay 4 The rationale of cost accounting, by R. S. Edwards (1937)
Essay 5 Business organization and the accountant, by R. H. Coase (1938/1973)
Essay 6 The subjective theory of value and accounting 'cost', by G. F. Thirlby (1946)
Essay 7 The Ruler, by G. F. Thirlby (1946)
Essay 8 The economist's description of business behaviour, by G. F. Thirlby (1952)
Essay 9 Uncertainty, costs, and collectivist economic planning, by Jack Wiseman (1953)
Essay 10 The theory of public utility price—an empty box, by Jack Wiseman (1957)
Essay 11 Economists' cost rules and equilibrium theory, by G. F. Thirlby (1960)
Footnotes
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The cuneiform inscription in the Liberty Fund logo is the earliest-known written appearance of the word "freedom" (amagi), or "liberty." It is taken from a clay document written about 2300 B.C. in the Sumerian city-state of Lagash.

It’s the end of reading week, I had three essays to write and I’m sitting here (evidently not writing an essay) with a few paragraphs of two essays written. Torn between procrastinating for the sake of it and genuinely disinterested, I realised the nerdy but brilliant reason I have been struggling; I am uninspired.

For any undergrads reading this, I do have the advantage of being a postgrad and therefore have three years of weekly essays to fall back on. After a year off, the adjustment to a big move to London and the freedom of a reading week (something I didn’t have at my previous university), the creative juices haven’t been forthcoming. Then I remembered – the biggest hindrance to a decent essay is the pressure to get the essay written. Here’s the trick:

Don’t write. Sit back. Think. Think some more. Then brainstorm something in a form which probably only makes sense to you (or maybe doesn’t even do that but you can find your great ideas in there somewhere).

The reality is; you’re going to have to write this essay. It’s probably not your first and it definitely won’t be your last. Make it interesting. Do you think something radical? Unsure? Run with it (as long you can reasonably back it up). Critique that leading academic, crack out some Brexit/Trump references: they’re your ideas, make them work.

You don’t want to read something boring, your tutor certainly doesn’t. Whether this is a formative reading week essay or a more important one later on – enjoy the process. We may not get as excited as all these crazy academics we surround ourselves with at LSE, but we were selected for a reason and we chose our courses for a reason. We also chose social sciences, so unless you’re an economist explaining an equation – take advantage of the ‘flexibility’ aka ‘no one really has the right answer anyway’.

Jodie Spencer

MSc student in International Relations. Into travelling and world-saving whilst not taking most things in life too seriously.

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